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Quaquaversality

Heh heh I thought I made a new derivation of a word which at the time of making my blog post didn't exist on the entire internet (at least I thought that was the case when I searched Bing and Google for 'quaquaversality' and it wasn't showing any results) but after posting and searching again I found 300 something entries. Oh well I'm still clever and if by chance there is someone with resources, out of the billions of people on this planet, who would like to get in contact with me on how to make our world and existence a better place then hit me up.

Quaquaversality - The state or condition of expansion in all directions from (and towards?) a common center.

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Referents:

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/quaquaversality

quaquaversality

 
 

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

quaquaversal +‎ -ity

Noun[edit]

quaquaversality (uncountable)

  1. (rare) Quality of being quaquaversal.

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http://www.wordreference.com/definition/quaquaversal

Etymology:

 

  • Latin quāquā vers(us) literally, wheresoever turned, turned everywhere + -al1
  • 1720–30
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quaquaversal (kwɑːkwəˈvɜːsəl)

adj
1. (Geological Science) geology directed outwards in all directions from a common centre: the quaquaversal dip of a pericline.
[C18: from Latin quāquā in every direction + versus towards]

Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003

  1. quaquaversal
    Web definitions
    1. going off in all directions at once towards a center; dipping towards a centre in all directions
      http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/quaquaversal

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    quaquaversal

    (adj.) moving or happening in every direction simultaneously

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  2. -ity | Define -ity at Dictionary.com

    dictionary.reference.com/browse/-ity‎ 
     
    a suffix used to form abstract nouns expressing state or condition: jollity; civility; Latinity. Origin: variant of -itie, Middle English -ite < Old French < Latin -itāt- (stem  ...

February 5, 2014 in Current Affairs | Permalink